William Shakespeare and John Florio

William Shakespeare true identity debate

William Shakespeare true identity debate

The life of Shakespeare is a fine mystery, and I tremble every day lest something should turn up.
Charles Dickens, 1847.

Forgive thy friends: they would, but cannot praise, inough’ the wit, art, language of thy PLAYES: forgive thy foes; they will not praise thee. Why? Thy Fate hath thought it best, they should envy.
Faith, for thy FOXES sake, forgive them those who are not worthy to be friends, nor foes. Or, for their owne brave sake, let them be still fooles at thy mercy, and like what they will.
John Florio (London 1607 Verses devoted to Ben Jonson for the publication of Volpone)

As for critics I accompt of them as crickets (…) they lurke in corners but catch cold if they look out (…) they are bred of filth & fed with filth, what vermine to call them I know not, or wormes or flies or what worse? (…) they do not seek honie with the bee, but suck poison with the spider. (…) As for me, for it is I, and I am an Englishman in italiane; I know They have a knife at command to cut my throate “Un Inglese Italianato è un Diavolo incarnato”.
John Florio, To the Reader, Second Frutes

L. May a man know your name I pray?
G. Yea sir, why not? My name is William.
L. I pray you sir tell me your name.
G. I am called W. at your commandement.
L. What countrey man, and of what place are you?
G. I am Italian, and of Padoa, at your commandement.
John Florio, Second Frutes, VI

The Shakespearian oeuvre is that of an authentic, highly cultivated professional, who must have spent his life studying languages and teaching, a professional with all the characteristics of the linguist John Florio.
Lamberto Tassinari

John Florio Portrait

John Florio Portrait

On July 12, 2013 Saul Frampton published in The Guardian the first part of a long article Who Edited Shakespeare? and a second part on August 10 titled In search of Shakespeare’s dark lady which open a new chapter in Shakespearian studies. Saul Frampton teaches at the University of Westminster, Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies. He is module leader for Reading the American Dream and Early Modern Identities. Four years after the book of Lamberto Tassinari John Florio The Man Who Was Shakespeare that was published in 2009, Frampton dares to establish, first time in the main stream a dangerous liaison between the linguist and translator of Jewish-Italian origin and the vacuous figure of the bard of Stratford or the actor, moneylender and playwright.
Saul Frampton doesn’t mention Tassinari’s work on Florio, however he expresses opinions as original and heretical as his! He also announces his forthcoming book on Shakespeare and Florio. Thanks to Frampton John Florio has now stepped into the foreground as the editor of the greatest writer in the English language. This would be a great honor in any case!
www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jul/12/who-edited-shakespeare-john-florio?INTCMP=SRCH#start-of-comments
www.theguardian.com/books/2013/aug/10/search-shakespeares-dark-lady-florio

But let’s find out a bit more about the author of John Florio, the man who was Shakespeare. Lamberto Tassinari was born in Castelfiorentino and spent his childhood on the island of Elba. After obtaining a degree in Philosophy from the University of Florence, he lived in Rome, Milan and Turin where he worked as a teacher and in several publishing companies. He moved to Montreal in 1981. Two years later he was one of the founders of the transcultural magazine ViceVersa which he directed until its last issue in 1997. Between 1982 and 2007, he taught Italian language and literature at the Université de Montréal. In 1985 he published a novel, Durante la partenza, in 1999 a collection of essays, Utopies par le hublot and in 2008 Shakespeare? È il nome d’arte di John Florio. He is currently at work on his second novel and on a production of The Tempest to be staged on the island of Vulcano in the Aeolian Archipelago off Sicily. For the first time ever, the play’s autobiographical nature will reveal the underlying, true identity of the Bard, John Florio.
http://www.johnflorio-is-shakespeare.com print John Florio The Man Who Was Shakespeare by Lamberto Tassinari Giano Books 429 pages.

To find out more about this matter follow this link:
http://www.daimon.org/lib/aforismi_geniali_di_w_shakespeare_new_edition.htm

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About Carl William Brown

I'm Carl William Brown a holistic teacher, a webmaster, a trader, and a writer of aphorisms and essays. I have written more than 9,000 original quotations and at present I'm also working at my only novel, Fort Attack, which is also a wide and open blog project. At the moment I'm teaching English in a secondary school, but up to now I have done a lot of other things as well, both in business, educational, sport and social fields. Some years ago, in 1997 following the examples of the Rotary or the Lyons Clubs I founded the Daimon Club Organization to promote every sort of activities, creativity, art, literature, new technologies, informatics, business and marketing, public health and education and to meet new friends with these kind of interests.
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